Forest 4 Climate Network Principles

Forest 4 Climate Network Principles

We endorse these principles

Reducing carbon pollution from poor management of tropical forests and sustaining their power to absorb more carbon – is one of the most immediate and cost-effective ways to fight climate change.

Implementing solutions to keep global climate change to a minimum are essential to safeguard vulnerable communities in California and around the world, because they are likely to be affected first and worst by its impacts.

Any effective effort to tackle climate change must include mechanisms to reduce tropical deforestation and forest degradation while increasing carbon stored in trees and plants.

The California Poppy Preserve in Palmdale, CA. Photo credit: © Dave Lauridsen for The Nature Conservancy

Tropical forests provide important benefits to people everywhere including California.

  • They provide clean air; they are the source of much of California’s water; their forests produce vital medicine, they are home to rare plants and animals.
  • Tropical forests also provide food, fiber, and livelihoods to indigenous and disadvantaged communities as well as for other local residents.

We believe that because of the size of its economy and its position as a global leader on climate change, action taken in California has impact within the state and globally.

California understands the importance of its role as a global climate leader and has agreements to collaborate with many governments beyond its borders including China, Portugal, Peru, Quebec and British Columbia Canada, and tropical forests states in Mexico, Brazil, Indonesia and Peru.

California should include tropical forest protection in its AB 32 Climate Change regulatory program:

  • to conserve tropical forests and protect its air, water, and public health
  • to reduce costs to California ratepayers and regulated businesses
  • to help alleviate poverty in forest communities through low-carbon economic development
  • to  lead  by example and catalyze action by others to reduce deforestation
  • to demonstrate successful implementation of the safeguards for indigenous peoples and other local communities that are included in the UN international REDD+ program
  • to enhance the UN climate treaty under development by building support for REDD+ (Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation).

Photo credit: © Devan King/The Nature Conservancy